Melbourne 2015 Review: DOWNRIVER Needs A Paddle

Downriver, the Australian feature debut from Grant Scicluna, certainly showed signs of promise: a dour but intensely quiet rumination of redemption set in a murky bush town filled with questionable characters. It certainly has the ingredients for an intriguing, mystery-fuelled thriller.... More »
  

Review: CATCH ME DADDY, Searing Violence And Cool Pacing Add Up To Trouble

Director Daniel Wolfe came into recognition with his awesome music video Time To Dance for the band The Shoes. The clip featured a disturbed psychopath, played by Jake Gyllenhaal, who, essentially, murdered hipsters who could not dance. This tongue-in-cheek idea... More »
  

Review: SHAUN THE SHEEP MOVIE, An Absolute Delight

Aardman Studios return to the big screen in cracking form with another rip-roaring roller coaster of action, smart humour and lovable characters. Shaun The Sheep Movie promises to delight fans of all ages, and long-time aficionados of the studio's signature... More »
By James Marsh   
  

Melbourne 2015 Review: HOLDING THE MAN Explores Doomed Love Delicately

From Neil Armfield, the director of doomed addict romance Candy, comes his latest, also doomed romance Holding The Man. Another adaptation, this time based on the life memoirs of Timothy Conigrave and his epic love for partner John Caleo.... More »
  

Fantasia 2015 Review: CHERRY TREE Yields Rotten Pits

The mantra "Death is only the beginning," is repeated throughout Irish occult horror Cherry Tree by the coven of witches who have infiltrated a small-town high school. Their sexy long tressed leader wears a guise as the girl's field hockey... More »
By Kurt Halfyard   
  

Review: ERNIE BISCUIT Is Deliciously Good

He has a funny name. He's got a disability. He is terribly lonely... He is Ernie Biscuit, a deaf Parisian taxidermist. If you are thinking to yourself that his story couldn't be too interesting, you are mistaken. Great storytellers can... More »
By Hugo Ozman   
  

Review: THE LITTLE DEATH, A Cheeky, Cracking Australian Comedy

Josh Lawson is a charming and cheeky fellow. His goofiness on screen and well-mannered presence has permeated execrable dross from Australia and made it watchable. His painful turn as Doug, the loser partner in Showtime's black comedy series House of... More »
  

Now On Blu-ray: TOKYO TRIBE, A Late-Night Mainstay In The Making

Sono Sion has always had an eclectic style of filmmaking, but in recent years he has really hit his stride, both in terms of artistry and quantity of his output. Sono is more prolific now than ever before - he... More »
By James Marsh   
  

Sydney 2015 Review: Under The WIDE OPEN SKY, Children Pursue Their Love Of Music

Every autumn, Australian conductor Michelle Leonard drives 4,000 kms across the outback of New South Wales in order to audition over 2,000 children for her Moorambilla Voices choir. Wide Open Sky is a documentary by director Lisa Nicol that chronicles... More »
By Hugo Ozman   
  

Review: SET FIRE TO THE STARS, A Tribute To A Poet, Poetry, And Cinema

It isn't easy to portray the literary arts on screen. Apart from having someone recite from a book (which can become tedious), the challenge becomes how to find the connection between the writer being portrayed, their work, and how that... More »
  

Review: MAD MAX: FURY ROAD, A Tour De Force Masterpiece

How's this for hyperbole: George Miller is the Australian Spielberg. You've got a director with a wide diversity of films (from The Road Warrior to Babe to Happy Feet), all injected with an almost preternaturally gifted ability to have... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Review: THE DEAD LANDS, Action Painted On A Broad Canvas

As is often the case with a classical heroic journey, what you get out of the quest is often what you bring to it. With some humility and patience, you'll be rewarded; wanting rewards without putting in the work to... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Review: 52 TUESDAYS, A Revelation In Storytelling

It is rare that a filmmaker's fiction debut feature is as assured, polished, and incredibly moving as Sophie Hyde's 52 Tuesdays. Winner of the World Cinema Dramatic Directing Award at Sundance 2014 (among numerous awards), not only does it tell the... More »
  

Review: '71, A Remarkably Assured, Emotionally Powerful Debut

Yann Demange is very clearly a filmmaker who knows what sort of stories he wants to tell and how he wants to tell them, the sort who clearly knows his own skill set, how to best put it to use,... More »
By Todd Brown   
  

Review: PLAN 9, The Spirit Of Ed Wood Is Alive And Well

Early on in Plan 9, a character complains that a remake of Plan 9 From Outer Space is the mother of all bad ideas. And really, it's hard to think of anything that could top Ed Wood's incompetent, legendary cheesefest... More »
  

Berlinale 2015 Review: 45 YEARS, A Heart-Wrenching Look At Late Marriage

How much can, or should we, let the past affect the present? If our lives went one way instead of another, can we mourn too much what we didn't have? If you think you were not your spouse's only great... More »
  

Review: WHAT WE DO IN THE SHADOWS, An Incredibly Funny, If Slightly Bloody, Romp

From the opening title card that reads "New Zealand Documentary Film Council," it's pretty clear that What We Do in the Shadows is not going to be your typical vampire movie. Co-directed by Taika Waititi (Eagle Vs. Shark, Boy) and... More »
By Ryland Aldrich   
  

Review: WYRMWOOD: ROAD OF THE DEAD Races Away From Doomsday

Wildly apocalyptic with dollops of silliness, Wyrmwood: Road of the Dead proves to be a splendidly gritty affair, a tale that feels like it's being told from the back of a jeep as it races away from doomsday on a... More »
By Peter Martin   
  

Berlinale 2015 Review: MR. HOLMES, A Fine Engagement With Age And Atonement

According to Guiness World Records, Sherlock Holmes is the most portrayed fictional character, by more than 70 actors in over 200 films, plays and television shows. I haven't seen all of those, but Ian McKellen can certainly put his performance... More »
  

DVD Review: Fei Mu's SPRING IN A SMALL TOWN From The BFI

Hailed as the greatest Chinese film ever made, Fei Mu's 1948 melodrama Spring In A Small Town arrives on DVD for the first time in the UK, courtesy of the BFI. A heartbreaking tale of loyalty, yearning and resilience in... More »
By James Marsh   
  
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