Review: GANGS OF WASSEYPUR, A Monster Of A Film

Pulling back, deliberately and slowly, from a soap-opera musical on the TV (involving, of all things, character introductions), the 315-minute long Gangs of Wasseypur kicks off with a single shot, Johnnie To-style unbroken assault on the stronghold of Faizal Khan... More »
By Kurt Halfyard   
  

Review: APPROPRIATE BEHAVIOR Marks The Emergence Of A Major Comedic Talent

Imagine, if you will, that Woody Allen, Jerry Seinfeld, and Louis CK got together to create a love child who had Lena Dunham as a nanny, and who grew up to become a bisexual Iranian-American woman. Such a person, if... More »
  

Review: BLANQUIAZUL, A Cheerful Tribute To A Soccer Team And Its Fans

Blanquiazul, from director Luis Castro Serrano, is the first Peruvian wide release of 2015. It's also a documentary, a genre which has been largely neglected by local directors (and distributors), save for Javier Corcuera, whose Sigo Siendo, about our country's... More »
  

Review: BLACKHAT, Michael Mann's Moronic Cyber Scavenger Hunt

Humanity's fascination with the microchip started long before they became everyday necessities for the first world population. You see, we humans have always taken strides for some semblance of consistency and structure through networks and grids. Design and architecture in the... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

Review: HOSTAGE, A Youthful, Nostalgic Take On Growing Up Slovak

Recent Czech cinema has been gaining a reputation when it comes to revisiting history. Hefty award festooned mini-series-cum feature film The Burning Bush directed by renowned filmmaker Agnieszka Holland and Andrea Sedláčková´s sports drama Fair Play shaped moral heroes... More »
By Martin Kudlac   
  

Review: AANMODDERFAKKER Never Gets Old

This year, one film was the surprise grand winner at the Dutch Film Festival where the Golden Calves are awarded, which basically are the Dutch Oscars. Michiel ten Horn's Aanmodderfakker won Best Film and Best Script, and its lead Gijs... More »
By Ard Vijn   
  

Review: HEROES Is One Step Forward, Two Backwards For Chilean Comedies

A couple of years ago I was reviewing the Chilean comedy film Barrio Universitario for this site, and as much as I didn't like that film very much, I still decided that it was a good show, maybe the only... More »
  

Review: LA ULTIMA PELICULA, Featuring A Melancholy, Amusing Apocalypse

The year 2012 was, for most of humanity, a waiting game. The Mayans predicted the world's end. Riots sprouted. Floods happened. Scandals erupted. It seemed the Mayans spoke true, but there was still no assurance that the world was on... More »
By Oggs Cruz   
  

Review: WHEN EVENING FALLS ON BUCHAREST OR METABOLISM, Witty And Structurally Elegant

Corneliu Porumboiu, with just three features now under his belt, has established himself as one of the finest filmmakers of the Romanian new wave. His previous films 12:08 East of Bucharest (2006) and Police, Adjective (2009) impressed film festival audiences... More »
  

Review: BELOVED SISTERS, Characters Who Never Become Real People

More than a film about a romantic ménage a trois, Beloved Sisters is just as well the story of two sisters, two women who swear loyalty to each other and keep their oath in spite of the biggest challenge their... More »
  

Review: THE WOMAN IN BLACK 2: ANGEL OF DEATH, Tortured Souls And Stiff Upper Lips

Tortured souls abound in the sequel to The Woman in Black (2012). It's 1941, and London is under attack. Eight schoolchildren are evacuated to safety in the countryside, under the care of headmistress Jean (Helen McCrory) and teacher Eve (Phoebe... More »
By Peter Martin   
  

Review: TAKEN 3, Action Cinema For Teenage Softies

Liam Neeson's third outing as over-protective family man Bryan Mills sees him on the run for murder after his ex-wife (Famke Janssen) turns up dead in his apartment. Forest Whitaker heads the investigation, which soon enough uncovers the involvement of... More »
By James Marsh   
  

Masacre En Xoco 2014 Review: MÉXICO BÁRBARO, A Horror Anthology That Could Have Been More Brutal

Mexico is barbaric, both historically and due to the violent present. Rather than making a clear reference to its main concept of exploring Mexican legends and traditions, horror anthology México Bárbaro kicks off as a straight exhibition of the violent... More »
  

Review: GLORIA, An Unrestrained Biopic Starring A Poor, Innocent Soul

Mexican pop star Gloria Trevi is the subject of a biopic that features the typical rise and fall of the protagonist, but that works too as a variation, thanks to the nature of the story. This means Gloria's rise and... More »
  

Review: [REC] 4: APOCALYPSE Never Reaches The Same Heights As The Original

It's certainly been a while, but the Sitges Film Festival and its audience hasn't forgotten about [REC] and the impression it left in its 2007 edition. The film, co-directed by Paco Plaza and Jaume Balagueró won the best director and... More »
By Guillem Rosset   
  

Review: Dan Villegas' ENGLISH ONLY, PLEASE, Feel-Good Rom-Com That's Good For The Soul

Dan Villegas' English Only, Please opens with Julian (Derek Ramsay), a New York City-based financial analyst, on the hunt for a Filipino translator to translate the venom-filled speech he wrote for his ex-girlfriend and teach him to say the translation... More »
By Oggs Cruz   
  

Review: Swiss Epic NORTHMEN - A VIKING SAGA Looks Like Hollywood Fare

Assessing the merits of Claudio Fäh's Viking odyssey is a tricky task because of what it represents in the panorama of Swiss genre films. With an international cast, and production set in South Africa, Northmen - A Viking Saga is... More »
  

Review: THE TAKING OF TIGER MOUNTAIN, A Wartime Epic With A Sense Of Adventure

Tsui Hark scores a resounding success with his spirited adaptation of classic adventure novel Tracks in the Snowy Forest. Again exploring the visual possibilities of 3D, while eschewing the typically austere tone of most wartime epics, The Taking of Tiger... More »
By James Marsh   
  

Review: FAR FROM MEN, A Great Viggo Mortensen Western

(How can you be Far From Men when Viggo is around?) As a preview for the upcoming International Film Festival Rotterdam next month, loyal visitors were allowed to see one of the films already: David Oelhoffen's Algeria-based western Far From... More »
By Ard Vijn   
  

Review: TWO DAYS, ONE NIGHT, Big Ideas That Play Out Brilliantly

Why did Two Days, One Night work so well for me? It's not easy to explain. This is especially the case, considering this is my first experience watching a film by Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne, and the fact I know... More »
  
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