Sundance 2016 Review: CHRISTINE, A Report On The Art Of Self-Destruction

Performance>Perfection>Breakdown.

No. That's not right. Run the film again. What do we see: A woman in her late twenties, dark hair, big eyes, tall; walking down the halls of a TV station. Take the splicer to the footage. Chop it in... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

Sundance 2016 Review: OPERATION AVALANCHE, For The Love Of Cinema

There is a lure to the film camera that is almost primal. It draws you in, ever closer, a potent combo of machine and magic. Pressed against your ear, your cheek, the click-whir miracle of celluloid is god calling you... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

Slamdance 2016 Review: MAD Finds The Humor In Sadness

Robert G. Putka has built up a smart and sharp filmography of shorts over the last half decade, emphasizing rich, rude and raw performances, deriving his drama and comedy with character first. MAD, his feature debut, is as charming as... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

Review: LOST IN MUNICH, A French Parrot In The Czech Republic

As the year 2015 drew to a conclusion, Czech film critics had to do their homework to round up domestic titles suitable for annual awards bearing their name. (The awards ceremony will be held on January 23). Out of... More »
By Martin Kudlac   
  

Review: AFERIM!, Angry And Rough, A Must-See Ride In Romania

For over a decade Romanian Cinema has produced many breathtakingly great films, and directors such as Cristi Puiu, Corneliu Porumboiu, Cristian Mungiu and Călin Peter Netzer have gained international recognition, becoming household names in world cinema. The usual term of... More »
  

Review: IP MAN 3, The Legendary Teacher Returns In Fine Form

In Ip Man 3, Donnie Yen returns for another outing as legendary martial arts instructor Ip Man. Still under the direction of Wilson Yip, the newest installment trades Sammo Hung for Yuen Wo-ping as action choreographer, ensuring that the extended... More »
By Peter Martin   
  

Review: BLEAK STREET, True Crime Turned Into A Visually Striking Dark Carnival

Bleak Street, the very appropriately named new film from veteran Mexican director Arturo Ripstein, is ripped from the headlines, much like the TV show "Law and Order." Inspired by the double murder of two dwarf men who were popular luchadores... More »
  

Review: Garrel's IN THE SHADOW OF WOMEN Finds Infidelity Is An Equal Opportunity Offender

Philippe Garrel, known for making films about deeply self-reflexive romantic entanglements since the late 60s, is at it again with In the Shadows of Women. Infidelity, art, improvisation, one-take scenes, shot in monochrome on film and natural settings have been... More »
By Dustin Chang   
  

Blu-ray Review: Criterion's BITTER RICE Is A Savory Dish

Cinephiles and historians can (and do) debate about which postwar Italian movies were a "betrayal" of the intentionally cultivated neorealism movement. But more plainly, a case could be made that neorealism got tired of itself. Or, more readily, Italian neorealism... More »
By Jim Tudor   
  

Review: MOOR, A Story Of Broken Tracks, Broken Lives, And Building Hope

It seems as though no matter where you look in Pakistan these days, the spectre of British imperial rule looms over the nation in ways that are perhaps so deeply ingrained in the fabric of the nation that's it... More »
By J Hurtado   
  

Review: DIABLO, A Western That Makes Its Genre Generic

The Western film genre, a main staple of American movies decades ago, but nowadays much scarcer, is currently enjoying a mini-revival, spearheaded by the current 70mm roadshow release of Quentin Tarantino's The Hateful Eight, in which Tarantino continues to marry... More »
  

Review: PARTISAN, A Chilling Take On Coming Of Age

Under the diligent guidance of institutions like Screen Australia, Australia seems to have become a very promising country for new emerging directors, and Ariel Kleiman is no exception. Within seconds of his uncompromising first feature's opening, it soon becomes apparent... More »
By Thomas Humphrey   
  

Review: INSIDE MEN, A Political Thriller That Goes For The Jugular

The year is almost up, the box office has been tallied and the people have spoken. Stories of greedy corporate heirs, crooked clergy, conniving journalists and dirty politicians have risen to the top of the pile, each more acerbic than... More »
By Pierce Conran   
  

Review: YOUTH... Without Youth

The older one gets, the less anything matters. So goes the observed mentality of the two main characters of Youth. Wealth is evident, opulence is everywhere, yet the souls of these people have only grown increasingly wanting. So wanting that that... More »
By Jim Tudor   
  

Review: SON OF SAUL, A Unique Holocaust Horror Story

Son of Saul has two obvious strikes against it. It's a handheld, close POV movie, usually the sign of filmmakers too austere to pick up a tripod, eschewing good framing in favour of shakycam "grit." Then there's the subject... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Review: THE TIGER, A Gory, Gorgeous Battle To The Death

Following the record-breaking success of Roaring Currents, Choi Min-sik returns to screens in another big-budget period epic, this time hunting down the last Korean tiger (as opposed to the last tiger in Korea, because this feline clearly has a national... More »
By Pierce Conran   
  

Review: LUNA DE MIEL (HONEYMOON) And Its Twisted Views On Love And Survival

Isabel lives across the street from Jorge, a doctor who lives alone in an immaculate home. To say that Jorge is infatuated with Isabel is a bit of an understatement. When Luna De Miel (Honeymoon) opens we see that Jorge... More »
By Andrew Mack   
  

Review: THE HIMALAYAS Swaps Snowflakes For Tears

For those looking for an expedition drama, be warned that despite its title, The Himalayas is first and foremost a melodrama. One concerning brotherhood, family and, above all, coping with grief. Himalayan expedition films seem to be in vogue at... More »
By Pierce Conran   
  

Review: THE WORLD OF KANAKO Goes Down A Cinematic Rabbit Hole

The first two minutes of Nakashima Tetsuya's violent and unrelenting The World of Kanako are a litmus test on whether one should proceed. A frenetic orgy of editing non sequiturs, both assaulting and attention grabbing, occurs right before slamming into... More »
By Kurt Halfyard   
  

Review: MACBETH, Injected With Dread And Cool

Justin Kurzel's Snowtown was a remarkable film, a brash feature debut that signaled the emergence of a unique talent joining a slew of them coming out of the Australian independent scene. Following up a powerful true crime story with... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  
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