Dustin Chang
Contributing Writer; New York

Full Disclosure 2014 The Directors Cut: Claire Denis

In 2014, Full Disclosure is turning its focus on the filmography of a different celebrated filmmaker each month, and challenging our writers to seek out something new to watch and consider from their sizeable oeuvres. This month welcomes the first... More »
  

Review: In Jos Stelling's THE GIRL AND DEATH, Beauty Matters

Recently I came across an article at salon.com titled David Foster Wallace was right: Irony is ruining our culture by Matt Ashby and Brendan Caroll. In it, they talk about our popular culture so completely immersed in irony and lazy... More »
  

NYC Happenings: Mizoguchi Kenji Retro At MoMI Will Feature All His 30 Surviving Films

Museum of Moving Image will host the massive 30 films retrospective of Mizoguchi Kenji, one of the Big Three of Japanese cinema (along with Kurosawa Akira and and Ozu Yasujiro). Simply titled Mizoguchi, the retro will feature every surviving film... More »
  

Series Preview: Art Of The Real Tests The Boundaries Of Documentary Filmmaking

Film Society of Lincoln Center's inaugural film series Art of the Real - a showcase for nonfiction films that pushes the farthest boundaries of documentary filmmaking, is for me, one of the most exciting film series I have had the... More »
  

Preview: Panorama Europe Spotlights New & Old Voices Alike

As spring finally arrives in the Big Apple so do a swatch of European films that have largely gone unnoticed even on the festival circuit. Leave it to the European Union National Institutes for Culture then to say "Hey, hold... More »
  

New Directors/New Films 2014 Review: SHE'S LOST CONTROL Gets Intimate

Professional intimacy takes center stage in Anja Marquardt's She's Lost Control. 'She' in this case is Ronah (Brooke Bloom), a thirty something, confident, determined woman pursuing a masters degree who makes living as a sexual surrogate - arranged by her... More »
  

Review: FINDING VIVIAN MAIER Delves Into A Mystery Well Worth Investigating

I became aware of Vivian Maier's beautiful photographs through my photographer friend about a year ago when he showed me a photo book he just purchased called Vivian Maier: Street Photographer. Those Rolleiflex medium format shot black and white photographs of... More »
  

Review: CESAR CHAVEZ Gets It Right

I gotta admit that I was very skeptical going into this movie. There is something very dreadful about patronizing Hollywood biopics that makes me shudder. But with its largely Mexican-American cast and Mexican actor-turned-director Diego Luna (Y Tu Mama Tambien,... More »
  

ND/NF 2014 Review: THE VANQUISHING OF THE WITCH BABA YAGA Is A Ravishing Meditation On Our Relationship With Nature

As a lover of old, rustic folktales and being married to a descendant of an eastern European Jew, Baba Yaga holds a special place in my heart. Creepier and more twisted than the Grimm Bros' tales, Baba Yaga tells a... More »
  

ND/NF 2014 Review: OF HORSES AND MEN Is A Delightfully Deadpan Comedy From Iceland

Iceland's most celebrated theater director, Benedikt Erlingsson, makes a film debut with Of Horses and Men, a wry, episodic tales of love and death in a small community all reflected on the eyes of the much coveted Icelandic horses. The... More »
  

Review: HONEY, A Beautifully Nuanced Directorial Debut From Actress Valeria Golino

Irene (Jasmine Trinca) lives alone by the ocean and has a peculiar job -- assisting deaths in terminally ill patients and their families by observing and providing poison used in putting down sick pets. Assisted suicide is a taboo subject... More »
  

Interview: Actress Valeria Golino On Her Directorial Debut, HONEY (MIELE)

Italian actress Valeria Golino (Rain Man, Hot Shots!, Indian Runner, Respiro among others) makes an assured directorial debut with Honey/Miele, a drama about a woman who assists suicides for a living. It's a beautiful film that plays out like a... More »
  

Preview: Rendez-Vous with French Cinema 2014 Packs A Punch

The 19th edition of Rendez-Vous with French Cinema, the Film Society of Lincoln Center and Unifrance Films' celebrated annual showcase of the best in contemporary French film, hits screens at The Film Society, the IFC Center and BAMcinématek in New... More »
  

Review: OMAR, A Heart Pounding Thriller And Tragic Love Story Set In The Occupied Territories

With Omar, this is the second time Palestinian director Hany Abu-Assad has been nominated for an Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film. (His previous effort, Paradise Now, ended up winning a Golden Globe only.) Even if you take away... More »
  

Interview: Hany Abu-Assad Talks OMAR And The Purity Of Cinema

Hany Abu-Assad's Omar, a political thriller and a love story set in the Occupied Territories, is Palestine's official entry for this year's Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film. This is Abu-Assad's second nomination in that category since Paradise Now... More »
  

Review: CHILD'S POSE Looks At Mommy Love

Winner of a Golden Bear at the Berlin Film Festival and Romania's official entry for Best Foreign Language Film for this year's Oscar, Calin Peter Netzer's Child's Pose is a riveting family drama spiked with some sharp social commentary that... More »
  

Film Comment Selects 2014: Ecclectic Mix of Critics' Darlings and Rediscoveries

Each year, Film Comment Magazine holds a film series at the Film Society of Lincoln Center, its selection of films assembled from festivals around the world by its esteemed editors. In its 14th year, Film Comment Selects 2014 consists of... More »
  

Review: Godfrey Reggio's VISITORS, A Gorgeous Visual Tone Poem

Koyaanisqatsi (1982), a genre-defining, landmark film that features stunning time-lapse photography and a hypnotic score by Philip Glass, expanded the boundaries of film. It garnered a cult following and spawned countless imitators in the commercial, documentary and narrative film worlds... More »
  

Review: LIKE FATHER, LIKE SON Affectingly Debates Nature Vs. Nurture

It seems Kore-eda Hirokazu is incapable of making bad movies. The babies-switched-at-birth premise in films is nothing new. But he just makes it so darn affecting and poignant, avoiding all the clichés that go with this kind of blurry-eyed family... More »
  

Interview: Kore-eda Hirokazu Talks LIKE FATHER, LIKE SON

Regarded by many as the best contemporary Japanese filmmaker and spiritual heir to the master filmmaker and humanist, Ozu Yasujiro, Kore-eda Hirokazu has been making quiet, deeply affecting films about childhood, family and death. I told myself not to cry... More »
  
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