Sundance 2016 Review: SKY LADDER: THE ART OF CAI GUO-QIANG Enthralls

Ever since I was a kid I was enthralled with fireworks. There's something completely primal about seeing fire at the best of times, but the kinetic, colourful explosions of a firework show tickles me on a deep and fundamental... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Review: AFERIM!, Angry And Rough, A Must-See Ride In Romania

For over a decade Romanian Cinema has produced many breathtakingly great films, and directors such as Cristi Puiu, Corneliu Porumboiu, Cristian Mungiu and Călin Peter Netzer have gained international recognition, becoming household names in world cinema. The usual term of... More »
  

Review: SYNCHRONICITY, Time Travel Is A Bastard

I never thought it would happen, but I have finally, personally, hit the wall with indie time travel flicks. Jacob Gentry's Synchronicity is not lacking in smarts or clockwork precision, but abjectly fails to convince in its core ideas of love... More »
By Kurt Halfyard   
  

Review: IP MAN 3, The Legendary Teacher Returns In Fine Form

In Ip Man 3, Donnie Yen returns for another outing as legendary martial arts instructor Ip Man. Still under the direction of Wilson Yip, the newest installment trades Sammo Hung for Yuen Wo-ping as action choreographer, ensuring that the extended... More »
By Peter Martin   
  

Review: BLEAK STREET, True Crime Turned Into A Visually Striking Dark Carnival

Bleak Street, the very appropriately named new film from veteran Mexican director Arturo Ripstein, is ripped from the headlines, much like the TV show "Law and Order." Inspired by the double murder of two dwarf men who were popular luchadores... More »
  

Review: TERMINUS Shoots For the Stars, Crashes

Directed and co-written by Marc Furmie, Terminus tells what happens when an alien pod or meteorite fragment falls to Earth. The story focuses on garage owner and mechanic David Chamberlain (Jai Koutrae) and his daughter Annabelle (Kendra Appleton) as they struggle... More »
  

Blu-ray Review: Criterion's GILDA Offers Caged Beauty

Many things have been written by plenty of film historians and critics on the essential film Gilda, the 1946 classic directed by Charles Vidor. Is it a drama or does it rest solely in the genre of film noir? Was... More »
  

Blu-ray Review: Criterion Keeps BURROUGHS: THE MOVIE Alive

For NYU grad student Jim Jarmusch, being consistently presented with scenes like Patti Smith dancing on the tables of Max's Kansas City, while the band Television helmed the stage, was all part of the New York landscape. Meanwhile, his best friend... More »
By Zach Gayne   
  

Review: Garrel's IN THE SHADOW OF WOMEN Finds Infidelity Is An Equal Opportunity Offender

Philippe Garrel, known for making films about deeply self-reflexive romantic entanglements since the late 60s, is at it again with In the Shadows of Women. Infidelity, art, improvisation, one-take scenes, shot in monochrome on film and natural settings have been... More »
By Dustin Chang   
  

Blu-ray Review: Criterion's BITTER RICE Is A Savory Dish

Cinephiles and historians can (and do) debate about which postwar Italian movies were a "betrayal" of the intentionally cultivated neorealism movement. But more plainly, a case could be made that neorealism got tired of itself. Or, more readily, Italian neorealism... More »
By Jim Tudor   
  

70s Rewind: HANNIE CAULDER, Raquel Welch Seeks Revenge In The Old West

Quentin Tarantino's new Western The Hateful Eight revolves around the vicious Jennifer Jason Leigh, who is eligible to be hanged for her crimes. Later this year, we'll finally get to see Natalie Portman in Jane Got a Gun, said to... More »
By Peter Martin   
  

Review: MOOR, A Story Of Broken Tracks, Broken Lives, And Building Hope

It seems as though no matter where you look in Pakistan these days, the spectre of British imperial rule looms over the nation in ways that are perhaps so deeply ingrained in the fabric of the nation that's it... More »
By J Hurtado   
  

Review: In THE FOREST, The Jump Scares Outnumber The Trees

The setting is suitably creepy, a thickly-wooded forest at the northwest base of Mount Fuji in Japan that is known as a terribly popular site for people to commit suicide. The Aokigahara forest has also become associated with the spirit... More »
By Peter Martin   
  

Review: DIABLO, A Western That Makes Its Genre Generic

The Western film genre, a main staple of American movies decades ago, but nowadays much scarcer, is currently enjoying a mini-revival, spearheaded by the current 70mm roadshow release of Quentin Tarantino's The Hateful Eight, in which Tarantino continues to marry... More »
  

Review: PARTISAN, A Chilling Take On Coming Of Age

Under the diligent guidance of institutions like Screen Australia, Australia seems to have become a very promising country for new emerging directors, and Ariel Kleiman is no exception. Within seconds of his uncompromising first feature's opening, it soon becomes apparent... More »
By Thomas Humphrey   
  

Review: YOSEMITE, Childhood Is Always Now

What is it about childhood that makes us adults so wary of who we once were? Perhaps it is that great fear of the unknown; a shadow, a whisper of adulthood, that as children scares us into submission of these... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

Review: ANOMALISA, A Real, Honest And Meaningful Gift

When the philosopher says, "Hell is other people," he perhaps means that in trying to figure ourselves out, we are beholden to our reflections and interactions with other people. Or maybe he is talking about the modern customer service experience. In... More »
By Kurt Halfyard   
  

Review: INSIDE MEN, A Political Thriller That Goes For The Jugular

The year is almost up, the box office has been tallied and the people have spoken. Stories of greedy corporate heirs, crooked clergy, conniving journalists and dirty politicians have risen to the top of the pile, each more acerbic than... More »
By Pierce Conran   
  

Review: CONCUSSION Strikes A Blow In Spite Of Itself

A more cynical filmgoer would likely say that there's a lot wrong with Concussion. And that opinion would not be incorrect. But that said, a longer look at it under the microscope might just reveal a thing or two.Sometimes an... More »
By Jim Tudor   
  

Review: THE REVENANT, An Admirable, Handsome Failure

It begins, as you might expect, with a sweeping shot that's equal parts glorious and gratuitous. For The Revenant isn't just some run-of-the-mill flick, this is Oscar-winning director Alejandro G. Iñárritu's latest flick, a follow up for his much-lauded Birdman.... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  
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