Review: DETECTIVE BYOMKESH BAKSHY, A Reimagining Of The Bengali Sherlock Holmes

Sometimes I loathe the expectations with which I burden myself.Dibakar Banerjee's latest film, Detective Byomkesh Bakshy, is a period piece that focuses on the origin of India's greatest literary sleuth. The Byomkesh Bakshy character comes from the many works of... More »
By J Hurtado   
  

Review: FURIOUS 7, Super-Charged And Super-Sized

Big, loud, macho cool. It took some convincing to get me to believe that there was anything more to the Fast & Furious series than that. By the time part five rolled around, I had still never seen one of these... More »
By Jim Tudor   
  

Review: THE HAND THAT FEEDS Sees A Resurgence Of The Ground-up American Labor Movement

The Hand That Feeds is a David and Goliath story playing out in the streets of New York. Directors Rachel Lears and Robin Blotnick document the struggle of the immigrant food service workers as they fight for their rights and respect.... More »
By Dustin Chang   
  

Review: COMMUNITY S6E04 "Queer Studies And Advanced Waxing", The Ponderous Natures Of Truth & Lies

In a comedy show, the cold open can be a glorious thing.It can set the tone for the rest of an episode, prepping us for the stories to unfold, or be its own little mini-tale, absurd, irreverent, and charming. Community's... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

Review: BETTER CALL SAUL S1E09, PIMENTO (Or, You're Not A Real Lawyer)

And, suddenly, it all makes sense. In one devastating conversation, Better Call Saul tells us everything we need to know about why Jimmy McGill becomes Saul Goodman, and in doing so it has revealed what I was so uncertain of... More »
By Simon Cocks   
  

Hong Kong 2015 Review: TWO THUMBS UP, A Delightfully Gonzo Heist Flick

Long-time screenwriter Lau Ho Leung (Painted Skin, Kung Fu Jungle) makes his directorial debut in this energetic action comedy following a gang of thieves who masquerade as cops to pull off a heist, only to encounter a rival posse with... More »
By James Marsh   
  

Review: ERBARME DICH - MATTHÄUS PASSION STORIES Targets The Purpose Of Sadness

(Don't feel bad, feel worse! Then, listen to exquisite music...) A documentary about classical music does, on paper, not seem to be a crowd-pleaser. Yet Ramón Gieling's Erbarme Dich - Matthäus Passion Stories was one of the big surprises at... More »
By Ard Vijn   
  

Review: SERENA Finally Lumbers Into Theaters

Hallmark Hall of Fame called, they said to stop right now - they do not have the budget for these movie stars...! Lantern-lit wood cabins and literary based period melodrama do not guarantee a respectable film. The problems with Serena... More »
By Jim Tudor   
  

Review: HOME, Awfully Sugary But Not Sweet

Home depicts nothing less than the most kid friendly alien invasion even committed to the screen. Back-burnering any trauma and horror of the human internment camps that it depicts (both off-world and in Australia), Home showcases an eye-poppingly wacky planetary occupation... More »
By Jim Tudor   
  

Review: WHITE GOD, When Dogs Inherit The Earth

Doggedly heavy on allegory, Hungarian director Kornél Mundruczó's White God (originally Fehér Isten) has a relatively simple premise: beware the comeuppance for those that treat badly those they believe to be inferior. At its heart, the film plays as if... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Review: THE SALT OF THE EARTH, Documenting A Visionary Photographer

There are a few titans of narrative cinema - Martin Scorsese and Spike Lee come first to mind - who make documentaries that rival their feature film work. Another example is Werner Herzog, a filmmaker whose non-fiction films are still... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Review: WHILE WE'RE YOUNG, A Couple Struggles With Middle Age

It pains me to give a Noah Baumbach film anything less than a glowing review, especially considering there is so much that works about his new film, While We're Young. The premise is his most appealing to date, which, at... More »
By Zach Gayne   
  

Review: GET HARD, Two Men, Two Races, One Joke

Less a movie than a set-up for a haggard series of intended comedy blackouts, the new film Get Hard relies far too heavily on the well-established screen personas of Will Ferrell and Kevin Hart to be successful on its own... More »
By Peter Martin   
  

Review: 52 TUESDAYS, A Revelation In Storytelling

It is rare that a filmmaker's fiction debut feature is as assured, polished, and incredibly moving as Sophie Hyde's 52 Tuesdays. Winner of the World Cinema Dramatic Directing Award at Sundance 2014 (among numerous awards), not only does it tell the... More »
  

Review: DANNY COLLINS, Al Pacino As Rock Star In Regret

When was the last time Al Pacino appeared uncomfortable or nervous on screen? Early in Danny Collins, an unabashedly mawkish trifle from writer/director Dan Fogelman, Pacino strides onto the stage at the Greek Theatre in Los Angeles, and belts out... More »
By Peter Martin   
  

Review: MAN FROM RENO, Hit & Miss Neo-Noir

Dave Boyle's fifth feature, Man From Reno, is in many ways both refreshing and frustrating in its pulp leanings. It is far less a typical pulse-pounding thriller, and more a good ol' fashioned mystery with its roots firmly planted in... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

ND/NF 2015 Review: COURT, A Sobering Look At India's Judicial System

Winner of the two prizes at the Venice Film Festival 2014, Chaitanya Tamhane's Court lends an earnest look at India's judicial system. The film is a sobering, eye opening experience.It starts with an arrest of an old folk singer and... More »
By Dustin Chang   
  

Review: BETTER CALL SAUL S1E08, RICO (Or, Let's Reassess In Six Months)

For all of its strengths, one thing Better Call Saul appears to lack is a firm sense of its overall narrative. Breaking Bad seasons are like lessons in structure, but this prequel doesn't appear to have quite the same composition.... More »
By Simon Cocks   
  

Review: Art Imitating Life Imitating Art Imitating...In THE KIDNAPPING OF MICHEL HOUELLEBECQ

Michel Houellebecq, the énfant terrible of French Literature, is regarded by many as the best European writer to emerge in decades. My first Houellebecq was Elementary Particles in the late 90s- the book was repulsive, depraved, nihilistic and shocking but... More »
By Dustin Chang   
  

Review: COMMUNITY S6E03, "Basic Crisis Room Decorum," One Doggone Night At Greendale

"Basic Crisis Room Decorum" doesn't in any way shape or form attempt to wow us with a hairband scheme, wacky hijinks, blockbuster homages, or even, despite that title, sensational End-Of-Greendale crises.It starts with what sounds like some rather pressing news... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  
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