Cannes 2015 Review: GREEN ROOM Doesn't Pull A Single Punch

Some gigs really aren't worth taking. That's a maxim that the members of broke touring punk band Ain't Rights probably haven't heard of and certainly aren't going to adhere to when they get offered $350 to play a backwater skinhead... More »
By Ryland Aldrich   
  

Review: POUND OF FLESH Is Soft In All The Wrong Places

Jean-Claude Van Damme continues to explore and embrace his darker side in this modest Asian action thriller, as a kidnap & rescue specialist who falls foul of organ traffickers in the Philippines. Sadly, budgetary constraints and a lack of interesting... More »
By James Marsh   
  

Cannes 2015 Review: SEA OF TREES, Glimpses Of Beauty Within A Poisoned Forest

It's never a good thing when a film gets booed, but it happens more frequently at Cannes than anywhere in my experience. Often this booing takes on a kind of group think, with headlines all over the world declaring the... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Cannes 2015 Review: IRRATIONAL MAN, Woody Allen's Maudlin, Disappointing Trifle

Let's make this perfectly clear - Woody Allen, director, is one of the most unique and prolific talents in the history of cinema. Every year we get a film on schedule, often a chatty and intellectually rich ensemble piece... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Cannes 2015 Review: COIN LOCKER GIRL Offers New Perspectives On Standard Thrills

Against a parking lot bursting with saturated colors, a person lies on the ground, at the mercy of another standing above them who wields a sashimi knife still dripping red from its last kill. Dark, bloody and stylish, this could... More »
By Pierce Conran   
  

Review: BOMBAY VELVET Takes A Gorgeous Look At Jazz Age Hoodlums

If there's anything that Bombay Velvet director Anurag Kashyap has taught us over his last couple of films, it's that he knows how to stage a rousing action sequence. Not only did he create the greatest gangster film of the... More »
By J Hurtado   
  

Cannes 2015 Review: THE LOBSTER Starts Strong But Loses Its Way

Boy, I wanted to love this movie. Really, I did. I mean, the first shot of the film is a delight - a woman is passively driving in a car. She gets out, windshield wipers still flailing away, and... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Cannes 2015 Review: THE SHAMELESS Delivers Hardboiled Melodrama With Top Drawer Performances

"Learn the rules like a pro, so you can break them like an artist." -Pablo Picasso Today's Korea, whether looking at its entertainment, fashion or culinary scenes, is a society awash with fusion. Nowhere is this more true than in... More »
By Pierce Conran   
  

Review: GOOD KILL Intelligently Examines Drone Warfare

"Keep compartmentalizing" is a piece of advice from a commanding officer to his ace pilot. This is darkly humourous, intelligent screenwriting because these drone-piloting soldiers spend 12 hours a day literally inside a box, albeit an air-conditioned one filled... More »
By Kurt Halfyard   
  

Cannes 2015 Review: THE ANARCHISTS Cares Not For Your Bourgeois Cinematic Ideals

How do you say "awards-bait" in French? Take two of the hottest young stars in France, team them up with a rising star director, and then give them a period topic with obvious shades of hot button current events. The... More »
By Ryland Aldrich   
  

Cannes 2015 Review: SON OF SAUL, A Wrenching, Riveting Holocaust Tale

Son of Saul has two obvious strikes against it. It's a handheld, close POV movie, usually the sign of filmmakers too austere to pick up a tripod, eschewing good framing in favour of shakycam "grit." Then there's the subject... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Cannes 2015 Review: SLEEPING GIANT, Provocative And Probing

Despite a seemingly endless number of tries, pulling off the 'coming-of-age' film well is miserably difficult. There's a balance between precociousness versus pandering that makes the balance extremely delicate, as complex and awkward as any pubescence. When it goes... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Jeonju 2015 Review: ISLAND, An Elegiac Arthouse Mystery

A man travels to Jeju Island, planning to kill himself in his grandparents' abandoned home, in the most intriguing Korean film to grace the Jeonju International Film Festival this year. A lushly filmed and thoroughly engrossing mystery channeling local family... More »
By Pierce Conran   
  

Review: PITCH PERFECT 2 Pitches Right Down The Middle

The Bellas are back, for more comedy wrapped up in singing, or vice versa, depending on your preference. As a movie, it's more of a fun night out at the theater than a stirring next chapter in the lives of... More »
By Jim Tudor   
  

Review: Téchiné's IN THE NAME OF MY DAUGHTER, Another Strong Outing From The Master Of Psychological Dramas

Based on the memoir of Renée Le Roux about the disappearance of her daughter Agnes, André Téchiné, the French master of subtle psychological dramas, tackles real life intrigue with In the Name of My Daughter. The Le Roux case held... More »
By Dustin Chang   
  

Review: DARK STAR: H.R. GIGER'S WORLD, An Intimate Look At H. R. Giger, Channeling Dark Side Of The Human Soul

Hans Ruedi Giger, the artist known for his nightmarish vision, passed away in 2014 at the age of 74. Luckily for us, Swiss documentarian Belinda Sallin has made a comprehensive, yet intimate portrayal of the artist just before his passing.... More »
By Dustin Chang   
  

Review: THE CONNECTION, An Entirely Redundant Tale

The Connection (titled La French in its native county) has the makings of a great film, which is what makes the final product such a disappointment. Drawing upon the same case that was the basis for the William Friedkin... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Indian Film Festival Los Angeles 2015 Review: DHANAK Will Open Your Eyes To The Power Of Hope

In Nagesh Kukunoor's Dhanak, a young boy and his slightly older sister trek hundreds of miles across the desert of Rajasthan in India in search of a cure to the boy's blindness. The trek is long, and not without its... More »
By J Hurtado   
  

Review: MAD MAX: FURY ROAD, A Tour De Force Masterpiece

How's this for hyperbole: George Miller is the Australian Spielberg. You've got a director with a wide diversity of films (from The Road Warrior to Babe to Happy Feet), all injected with an almost preternaturally gifted ability to have... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

LA Asian 2015 Review: THE CHINESE MAYOR Manages To Be Portrait And Landscape

The documentary scene in China is difficult to approach, especially when so many of the works are strictly forbidden to be shown there. With so many independent film festivals being banned and even raided by Chinese government officials, it's truly... More »
  
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