Review: THE GREEDY TIFFANY, A Feat In Czech Genre Production

Genre production does not really thrive in Czech Republic. The contrary seems to be the case, and it appears to be rather an endangered species. This year saw the release of two horror films of the same breed (found footage). While... More »
By Martin Kudlac   
  

Locarno 2015 Review: RIGHT NOW, WRONG THEN, Stars Shine In Classic Hong Sangsoo

Following Hong Sangsoo's career guarantees for viewers, at the very least, one thing - developing a keen eye for detail. The auteur's films are remarkably similar to one another, from their lecherous male director/professor characters and conversations over bottles of... More »
By Pierce Conran   
  

Review: PRINCE, Innocence Triumphs Over Thug Life

Young Dutch filmmaker Sam de Jong's debut film Prince has all the stereotypical elements that make up a so-called gangsta movie: guns, drugs, babes, bling-blings and expensive sports mobiles. But underneath all its macho posturing, inner-city working class clichés and... More »
By Dustin Chang   
  

Review: BIG SKY, A Modest, Quiet Survival Drama

Like many sophomore features, Jorge Michel Grau's Big Sky suffers a bit by comparison with what came before. That's especially so because Grau debuted with the immensely impressive Somos lo que hay (We Are What We Are), an atmospheric character... More »
By Peter Martin   
  

Review: MISTRESS AMERICA, Easy, Breezy Comedy With A Point

After falling into a depressing, dour pit with 2010's Greenberg, director Noah Baumbach rebounded with the far more lighthearted and sprightly Frances Ha, which he co-wrote with Greta Gerwig. Their collaboration continued on a successful note with last year's While... More »
By Peter Martin   
  

Review: ONE & TWO, Emotionally Rich And Surprisingly Mystical

Isolation can be a killer. For the children who are the heart and soul of One and Two, that's especially so, given that they have been raised in isolation, surrounded by a giant wall. Eva (Kiernan Shipka, Mad Men) and... More »
By Peter Martin   
  

Review: PEOPLE, PLACES, THINGS, A Lovely, Comforting Film

People, Places, Things is a dry, almost forgettable title that refers to a film much better than those adjectives strung together by commas. It's a quotidian moniker for a film that's kind of exceptional, celebrated not only because of its... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Review: THE GLASS MAN, A Frightening Spiral Into A Personal Hell

The most uncomfortable subject is not sex; it is money. Not in political discussions, but personal ones. We don't ask people how much money they make; we don't ask them about their personal finances. It is probably safe to assume... More »
  

Lima 2015 Review: THE FIRE (EN INCENDIO) Consumes A Relationship And Makes You Watch

Brutal and horrifying are words you'd normally use to describe a horror movie, not a relationship drama, but The Fire (El Incendio), from first-time director Juan Schnitman, earns them. It has nothing to do with ghosts or monsters, but it's... More »
  

Review: AMNESIAC, Michael Polish's Refreshing Take On A Hostage Thriller

Twin filmmakers Michael and Mark Polish occupy a special spot in the American indie landscape. Since their strong debut Twin Falls Idaho, a weird little movie about conjoined twins, the brothers have been chugging along surviving in Hollywood, acting and... More »
By Dustin Chang   
  

Review: WE COME AS FRIENDS, Shadows Of Colonial Past Still Loom Over South Sudan

Hubert Sauper, a Paris based filmmaker known for his searing eco-disaster exposé in Tanzania, Darwin's Nightmare (2005), continues to document the African continent in his new documentary, We Come As Friends. This time, he sheds light on the post-referendum era... More »
By Dustin Chang   
  

Lima 2015 Review: DOS BESOS, A Melodrama With Some Surprises

Peruvian director Francisco J. Lombardi has worked steadily since the late 70s, having made 18 films; not a small feat in a country where making movies is a difficult task. The Lima Film Festival is one of the longest running... More »
  

Review: THE MAN FROM U.N.C.L.E. Targets Style Over Spying

For its big screen reboot of the classic 60s spy series, Warner Brothers is hoping Guy Ritchie can replicate the success of their earlier Sherlock Holmes adaptations, again favouring witty banter and period detail over the material's more action-oriented elements.... More »
By James Marsh   
  

Review: STRAIGHT OUTTA COMPTON, An Artful And Entertaining Musical Biopic

"You are now about to witness the strength of street knowledge." So begins the title track of NWA's seminal 1988 album Straight Outta Compton, a hip-hop landmark that almost single-handedly changed the direction of the art form. The making of... More »
  

Review: THE BEAUTY INSIDE, High Concept Melo Is More Glib Than Its Title

A corporate-sponsored high concept web series gets the glossy Korean melodrama treatment in The Beauty Inside, the top romantic offering of the season. Featuring a laundry list of Korean stars all playing the same character, this debut film by music... More »
By Pierce Conran   
  

Fantasia 2015 Review: NINA FOREVER Is A Threesome With Sex, Love And Death.

I had a university professor (English literature) who was fond of saying, "Nobody walks away happy from a threeway." I wonder what he would have to say about the Blaine Brothers' Nina Forever, a dark but droll relationship drama that... More »
By Kurt Halfyard   
  

Melbourne 2015 Review: DOWNRIVER Needs A Paddle

Downriver, the Australian feature debut from Grant Scicluna, certainly showed signs of promise: a dour but intensely quiet rumination of redemption set in a murky bush town filled with questionable characters. It certainly has the ingredients for an intriguing, mystery-fuelled thriller.... More »
  

Review: MEMORIES OF THE SWORD, Remembering Better Sword Fighting Flicks

The wild card in the quartet of major Korean releases scheduled for this year's high summer season (alongside Assassination, Veteran and The Beauty Inside), the star-driven period spectacle Memories Of The Sword proves to be a perplexing experience with jarring... More »
By Pierce Conran   
  

Review: FANTASTIC FOUR Reboot Made From Unstable Molecules

Sigh. I guess it's clobberin' time... Not to spoil anything, but at the end of 20th Century Fox's latest reboot of the Fantastic Four, we're left with a giant crater. In more ways than one. The pop culture desolation remaining in... More »
By Jim Tudor   
  

Review: CALL ME LUCKY, Hilarious, Moving, And Deeply Affecting

I admit that when I first saw Bobcat Goldthwait on screen sometime in the 1980s, he of the Grover voice making me laugh in the second Police Academy movie, it never occurred to me that he'd be helming one... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  
  Next »
Page 2 of 435