Review: THE ZERO THEOREM, A Step Back Into The Future

In Terry Gilliam's The Zero Theorem, the old master of visual overload and absurd humor heads back to his "Brazilian" roots. He tells the story of Qohen Leth, a schizophrenic futuristic data mathematician trying to find a solution for the... More »
  

Toronto 2014 Review: ST. VINCENT Delivers Vintage Bill Murray

Not everybody watches quite as many films as some of us. There are those where getting out to a theatre isn't a weekly (or, in my case, daily) occurrence, where the schlepp of getting there, standing in line, getting... More »
  

Review: CANTINFLAS, A Romanticized Biopic

Actor Óscar Jaenada might be Spanish but he was the perfect choice to play the role of Mario Moreno, also known as "Cantinflas," one of Mexico's most beloved and legendary comedians. In Sebastián del Amo's Cantinflas, Jaenada delivers a performance... More »
  

Review: THE GUEST, More Magnificent Midnight Madness

With last year's release of You're Next and contributions to the V/H/S and ABCs of Death horror anthologies, director-writer duo Adam Wingard and Simon Barrett are quickly becoming two of the most exciting filmmakers working in the genre space right... More »
  

AI WEIWEI THE FAKE CASE: Out Now On VOD

Danish director Andreas Johnsen's documentary Ai Weiwei The Fake Case follows the acclaimed Chinese artist from his release after an 81-day internment, through his house arrest, and his fight against trumped up tax fraud charges by the Chinese Government. The... More »
  

Blu-ray Review: THE DEVIL IS A PART-TIMER Delivers Funny Anime-Fast-Food

(If you thought curly fries were the most twisted thing in fast food, think again...) This week, the hit anime The Devil is a Part-Timer will be released in Australia and New Zealand, courtesy of local distributor Siren Visual. Known... More »
By Ard Vijn   
  

Toronto 2014 Review: WHILE WE'RE YOUNG Is Too Proud Of Being Old

It pains me to give a Noah Baumbach film anything less than a glowing review, especially considering there is so much that works about his new film, While We're Young. The premise is his most appealing to date, which, at a glance,... More »
By Zach Gayne   
  

Review: DOCTOR WHO S8E04, LISTEN (Or, The Doctor Has A Question, Clara Has A Date, Both Go To The End Of The Universe)

"Listen" is Doctor Who at its best. And its scariest. The show hasn't been this terrifying in a while, and Steven Moffat's episode manages to have a bit of everything you could possibly want. It's gripping, funny and tense, providing... More »
  

Toronto 2014 Review: THE LOOK OF SILENCE Is A Film For The Ages

Since I saw it back at the 2012 Toronto International Film Festival, Joshua Oppenheimer's The Act Of Killing has lived up to my early impression - that the work is truly one of the great films of all time,... More »
  

Toronto 2014 Review: THE EDITOR Is Eager To Please

The directors of The Editor, Adam Brooks and Matthew Kennedy, along with the rest of their cohorts from VHS-obsessed Winnipeg film collective Astron-6, must have been mighty pissed when they caught wind of Berberian Sound Studio. Peter Strickland's 2012 film was... More »
  

Toronto 2014 Review: THE VOICES, Silly And Schizoid

It's days after I saw it, and I still haven't decided if Marjane Satrapi's The Voices is sublime or shit. I think, frankly, that it's an unholy combination of both, a mess of a film that still has moments... More »
  

Review: THE MAN ON HER MIND Can't Imagine Rom-Com Success

In the world of "indie filmmaking," there are some pretty readily identifiable tiers. There is, of course, the Sony Pictures Classics level of indies - the kind of films with budgets reaching well into the millions, featuring recognizable stars and often... More »
By Jim Tudor   
  

Toronto 2014 Review: LEVIATHAN Takes A Gorgeous And Savage Look At Modern Russia

A rundown fishing town on the coast of the Arctic Ocean is the rugged edge-of-the-world stage for Andrey Zvyagintsev's complex, but quite accessible, new film. There is a visual mastery of relating wide open natural spaces, with precise man-made interiors, present... More »
  

L'Etrange 2014 Review: THE TRIBE, No Sound, But A Whole Lot Of Fury

Not one word of dialogue is spoken in director Myroslav Slaboshpytskiy's The Tribe, a stark Ukrainian drama that mixes gang thriller with boarding school intrigue, and pushes the maxim 'show don't tell' into brutal new extremes. The film presents a... More »
By Ben Croll   
  

Review: HONEYMOON, All Parts Scare

From Honeymoon's opening montage of our newlywed couple reminiscing about falling in love, you might think you are settling in for romantic drama about the challenges of starting a life together. You'd be wrong. While plenty of challenges await our... More »
  

Review: AT THE DEVIL'S DOOR, Quiet Horror With A Touch Of The Creepy Crazy

A teenage girl in love with a teenage boy plays a cryptic game. A twenty-something woman goes about her rounds as a real estate agent in a depressed market, then visits her younger sister, a depressed artist. These three women... More »
  

Toronto 2014 Review: '71 Is A Remarkably Assured, Emotionally Powerful Debut

Yann Demange is very clearly a filmmaker who knows what sort of stories he wants to tell and how he wants to tell them. The sort who clearly knows his own skill set, how to best put it to use,... More »
By Todd Brown   
  

Toronto 2014 Review: Jennifer Aniston Bares Her Soul In CAKE

"I hope you're ready to be depressed," whispered the person sitting next to me to no one in particular as the opening frames of Cake started to roll. Indeed, director Daniel Barnz's film about a woman confronting debilitating pain, drug... More »
  

MICGénero 2014 Review: MI VIDA ES UN ALBUR, Or, Being A Tough Woman In Tepito

Mi Vida Es Un Albur is a documentary set in the "barrio bravo" Tepito, one of Mexico's toughest neighborhoods. Located in downtown Mexico City, very near Garibaldi and the Palace of Fine Arts, Tepito is best known for its enormous... More »
  

Toronto 2014 Review: THE DUKE OF BURGUNDY, A Sublime And Specific Sex Comedy

Starting off with what is undoubtedly the opening credit sequence of the year, Peter Strickland's The Duke of Burgundy never ceases to surprise and delight over its 100 minutes, offering a dry but meticulous humour and rhythm. Those credits, offering... More »
  
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